Alaskan Alpinist Steve Hackett, and Other Notes

Spooky Nook Climbing Gym Boulder

The stand-alone boulder at Spooky Nook, Lancaster County, PA (All rights reserved)

I recently read an article about how expectations can kill relationships — any relationship. For instance, for someone that hasn’t gone backpacking before but wants a romantic stroll into the outdoors to see beauty and feel refreshed might be jolted by the hard work and occasional bad weather. The article recommended that we let observation dictate our vision and judgment rather than our expectations. It’s a little different than just “going with the flow,” because its the essence of adventure; mystery. Don’t try to set expectations, rather let the world tell you the story it has and accept and embrace it for what it is, whatever it is.

This makes me think of Steve Hackett’s great adventure. In 1976, he set off alone to the remote Brooks Range in Alaska’s far north. His objective was Mount Igikpak. It wasn’t grand like Mount Huntington or the Matterhorn; in fact most of the images I’ve seen of it make it look worthy of being overlooked. It had been climbed twice before in no distinctive style; first by a team lead by David Roberts in 1968. Hackett had a bold vision.

Hackett traveled solo by inflatable kayak and on foot to the peak. He went alone, without support, and no bush planes and before helicopters were popular. The summit pyramid presented overhangs on every flank. His limited protection gear forced him to rely on old gear from the previous ascents, which could easily have been deemed stupid or reason to turn around to many other climbers. Despite the danger, he was bold, considered the risk, and went for it, and stood on top.

After returning to the base, he waited for friends to travel together. They never came. He got his inflatable kayak back out and paddled 365 miles in under eight days down the Noatik River.

Where would Hackett have been had he not adapted to the challenges and only allowed expectations to get in his way?

TSM Moved to Lancaster, Pennsylvania

I worked in Washington, DC for 15 years and owned a condominium across the Potomac River for 10 of them. For a while I thought I lived in suburbia; in terms of my commute it felt like it, except that area of Northern Virginia, like all of Northern Virginia, is urban. I have been a sham of a suburbanite. Natalie and I once considered renaming this blog The Urban Mountaineer. Well, all that started to change in July when I accepted an unexpected job offer with a Habitat for Humanity in Central Pennsylvania

I am now entrenched in a suburban neighborhood. I bought a house, a second car, a lawn mower, changed the home’s flooring, and painted the bedrooms.

I had never considered living in Lancaster County until the job came along. It’s more than an Amish, rural, or a tourist destination. It is a beautiful diverse community with hard-working farms, hills, and wonderful neighbors. But it’s also one of Pennsylvania’s most urban counties outside of Pittsburgh and Philadelphia. And Lancaster County currently hosts two climbing gyms — Lititz recROC and the gym at the Spooky Nook Sports complex.

I feel closer to the earth here, the way I do when I visit Vermont. The small farms in Vermont give visitors intimate access to their work, but also reinforced Aldo Leopold’s notion of community where it’s more than just institutions and people, but land and wildlife too.

My boxes of climbing books, magazines, and maps are all back together. The contents are all on a shelf, though a little disorganized at the moment. I’ve realized that I need those books, not just the Internet, to write this blog. As much as I want to believe reading is reading wherever you find it, my attention to a nuanced story about a climb or a personal struggle can’t be interrupted by text messages or news alerts. My new piece of advice for any reader, if you’re going to read, set aside some time devoted to reading and reading alone. Personally, I like to read after the kids go to sleep and reading in the same room as Natalie in our new home.

I think with things settling down and coming together, the monthly newsletter will finally get off the ground and into your inboxes. Thanks to everyone who have subscribed — and wow, there are a lot of you — you won’t be disappointed.

Thanks again for stopping by. If you enjoyed this post, you might enjoy receiving my monthly newsletter with more climbing history, news on upcoming books, and climbing art by some talented artists.

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